NSAID's inhibit ovulation after just 10 days

NSAID's inhibit ovulation after just 10 days

Science Daily published a stunning report from the European League Against Rheumatism showing that common non steroidal anti-inflammatory medications inhibit ovulation and lower progesterone levels.  Here’s a summary of the abstract:

Summary: The results of a new study show that diclofenac, naproxen and etoricoxib significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain. Of the women receiving NSAIDs, only 6.3 percent (diclofenac), 25 percent (naproxen) and 27.3 percent (etoricoxib) ovulated, compared with 100 percent of the control group.

Report: The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) show that diclofenac, naproxen and etoricoxib significantly inhibit ovulation in women with mild musculoskeletal pain. Of the women receiving NSAIDs, only 6.3 percent (diclofenac), 25 percent (naproxen) and 27.3 percent (etoricoxib) ovulated, compared with 100 percent of the control group.

These findings suggest that readily available non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) could have a harmful effect on fertility, and should be used with caution in women wishing to start a family.

‘After just ten days of treatment we saw a significant decrease in progesterone, a hormone essential for ovulation, across all treatment groups, as well as functional cysts in one third of patients,’ said study investigator Professor Sami Salman, Department of Rheumatology, University of Baghdad, Iraq. ‘These findings show that even short-term use of these popular, over-the-counter drugs could have a significant impact on a women’s ability to have children. This needs to be better communicated to patients with rheumatic diseases, who may take these drugs on a regular basis with little awareness of the impact.’

NSAIDs are among the most commonly used drugs worldwide, and are taken by more than 30 million people every day. Available without prescription, NSAIDS are largely used for the treatment of pain, inflammation and fever — all common features of rheumatic conditions.

Thirty nine women of childbearing age who suffer from back pain took part in the study, and received diclofenac (100mg once daily), naproxen (500mg twice daily) and etoricoxib (90mg once daily) or placebo. Treatment was given for 10 days from day 10 of the onset of the menstrual cycle; hormonal analysis (progesterone level) and follicle diameter were conducted via blood sample and ultra sonsography respectively. At the end of the NSAID treatment period, the dominant follicle remained unruptured in 75 percent, 25 percent and 33 percent of patients receiving diclofenac, naproxen and etoricoxib respectively. Rupturing of the dominant follicle, and subsequent release of an oocyte (unfertilised egg), is essential for ovulation to occur.

‘These findings highlight the harmful effects NSAIDs may have on fertility, and could open the door for research into a new emergency contraception with a more favourable safety profile than those currently in use,’ concluded Professor Sami Salman.


http://www.eular.org

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/15061…

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In January of 2016 I had an hysterosalpingogram (HSG). This test showed that both of my fallopian tubes were blocked at the midsections. Although never diagnosed, I believe the blockages were due to endometriosis, which caused scar tissue around my fallopian tubes. The fertility specialist that performed the HSG told us that we would never conceive naturally, ie without IVF. I came to Cara in May of 2016 with blind hope. The initial consultation was in depth and covered many aspects of my health, emotional state and lifestyle. I finally felt that I was being listened to about my health issues and concerns. She guided me through dietary changes and supplements after that initial 2 hour appointment. Then we started with acupuncture and herbs and I soon noticed a difference with my periods. We monitored my cycles together. Through the whole process I never let myself lose hope and Cara was my cheerleader through it all! In Jan of 2017 I felt it was time to get another HSG to see if any progress had been made. To schedule this I needed to see a fertility specialist. We went to a different medical office and this specialist took a brief glance at my chart from my previous fertility testing and continued to council me on IVF as my only option. The fertility doctor was reluctant to order me another HSG, but finally agreed to write an order for the testing. My GYN performed the HSG in February of 2017 and to everyone’s surprise, BOTH tubes were completely OPEN. Despite having turned 40, we conceived naturally the next month and now I have a very active (downright wiggly) 5 month old. If it wasn’t for Cara Frank my daughter wouldn’t be here. I can never thank her enough for my little fish!

M.D.