What’s Cara Cooking? Soup!

What’s Cara Cooking? Soup!

The cool weather is making me crave warming soups filled with beans and vegetables.I started off with the idea of making beans with greens- more like a stew to ladle over polenta, but like most of my food: the contents of the fridge dictate the dish.

Into the Dutch oven went onions, carrots and garlic sautéed in olive oil. How much? Some. As in, an unmeasured amount based on the food at hand: A very large onion because that’s how big it was. 3 carrots because that was how many were in the bag. 7 tiny cloves of garlic because that was what was left on the head. Then a cup of dried cannellini beans and a Parmesan rind for yummy umami (keep saying that: yummy umami. Mmmmmm). I added a large sprig of sage from my garden. So far, this is all according to plan. But then, I ran into several of the last sad yellow tomatoes from our garden, which really needed cooking. For the life of me, I cant’ figure out why hardly any ripened when the weather was hot. Now, I have dozens in a weird greenish state. Must Google green tomato storage.

I found a lone container of pumpkin in my freezer that I had prepared last year- so in that went, adding golden sweetness to the soup. I love how pumpkin and squash lend a sweet note to soups and also give it a silky mouth feel. I also like how that offsets the flavor of sharp greens. I added half a spicy pepper that was asking for attention and salt and pepper. The final step was folding in a giant bunch of beet greens into the soup. Normally- this is a difficult green to cook with, as it infects everything you cook with a reddish hue. Since my soup was already an orangey color, this worked in my favor. Not so much the putrid looking beet green pesto we tried this summer, but oh well.

Serve it with a baguette or for you gluten-free folks, make some cornbread. Enjoy!

Leave Your Comments

blog comments powered by Disqus

In January of 2016 I had an hysterosalpingogram (HSG). This test showed that both of my fallopian tubes were blocked at the midsections. Although never diagnosed, I believe the blockages were due to endometriosis, which caused scar tissue around my fallopian tubes. The fertility specialist that performed the HSG told us that we would never conceive naturally, ie without IVF. I came to Cara in May of 2016 with blind hope. The initial consultation was in depth and covered many aspects of my health, emotional state and lifestyle. I finally felt that I was being listened to about my health issues and concerns. She guided me through dietary changes and supplements after that initial 2 hour appointment. Then we started with acupuncture and herbs and I soon noticed a difference with my periods. We monitored my cycles together. Through the whole process I never let myself lose hope and Cara was my cheerleader through it all! In Jan of 2017 I felt it was time to get another HSG to see if any progress had been made. To schedule this I needed to see a fertility specialist. We went to a different medical office and this specialist took a brief glance at my chart from my previous fertility testing and continued to council me on IVF as my only option. The fertility doctor was reluctant to order me another HSG, but finally agreed to write an order for the testing. My GYN performed the HSG in February of 2017 and to everyone’s surprise, BOTH tubes were completely OPEN. Despite having turned 40, we conceived naturally the next month and now I have a very active (downright wiggly) 5 month old. If it wasn’t for Cara Frank my daughter wouldn’t be here. I can never thank her enough for my little fish!

M.D.